All posts by bnmccain

06-Changes to Canada’s fisheries law alarm biologists

In 2012, Canada enacted the Fisheries Act that stripped away the protection over freshwater species. The law to protect the fish began in 1868 and protected all fish and their habitat. It now restricts the protections over fish that are “part of the commercial, recreational, or aboriginal fishery and only against serious harm.” (Clifton) About 80% of Canada’s fish are at risk of extinction. This could effect fish in the United States as well.

http://www.nature.com/news/changes-to-canada-s-fisheries-law-alarm-biologists-1.14234

05-Cod Fishing Catches Plummet in Waters off New England

This article is about the decrease of cod in New England. With the decrease of population, fisheries are beginning to wonder if cod fishing is history now. Last year was one of the worst years with bringing in less than 170,000 pounds into Maine. In the 1990’s, cod fishing was abundant with fishermen bringing in 21 million pounds in a year. It was found in 2014 that the spawning population had reached its lowest point in history. They do not have high hopes that there will be much recruitment for the time being.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/maine/articles/2017-03-24/maines-cod-fishermen-have-worst-year-in-history 

News with Fins 4 “Fishermen call for early meeting about Kuskokwim salmon”

In Bethel, AK residents are trying to work out a salmon management plan for the Kuskokwim River with state biologists. There are signs showing that there will be a decline in the amount of fish in the river. They want a plant to be created as soon as possible so that it doesn’t come about while people are putting camp together so they can fish. The King salmon run has been decreasing over the past five years. They are hoping to have a meeting scheduled in March.

http://www.newsminer.com/news/alaska_news/fishermen-call-for-early-meeting-about-kuskokwim-salmon/article_649f75c0-0041-11e7-bebe-b3dfe8378cdc.html

Basking Shark Migration

 

 

Basking Shark

Up until recently, the winter habits of the basking sharks has remained a mystery. With the help of a satellite, scientists have been able to study their migrations in the North-east Atlantic ocean. Scientists used to believe that the sharks hibernate in the waters off of the UK and Ireland. It is important to know their locations so that they can be protected.

Basking sharks face many issues including commercial fishing, boat strikes and ocean noise. They are considered endangered in north-east Atlantic waters and vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170220084153.htm

 

Atlantic Porkfish

The Atlantic Porkfish is a feisty and aggressive fish that you can find in almost any aquarium in the world. Their common names are Porkfish, Atlantic Porkfish and the Paragrate Grunt. The scientific name is Anisotrmus Virginicus. They are found in the Western Atlantic Ocean from Florida down to Brazil as well as the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and the Bahamas. They live in shallow inshore waters in reefs and rocky bottoms.  Porkfish can be found at depths of 6ft down to 65 feet. They are nocturnal and travel in large schools. Very little is known about spawning but it is known that they stay in pairs during breeding season.

 

They are predators/carnivores and feed on invertebrates that include mollusks, worms and small crustaceans. Juvenile porkfish feed on parasites from the skin and scales of other fish. Predators of porkfish include sharks, snappers and groupers.

Porkfish are known for making grunt like sounds with their pharyngeal teeth and swim bladder which is why they are put into the Paragrate Grunt family.